Reports to Parents

Year 7

The National Curriculum clearly outlines the knowledge, skills and understanding that students are expected to develop and apply at Key Stage 3 in each subject area*. The descriptors below show to what extent your child is meeting these expectations.

W  Working at a pre-Key Stage 3 level
W+  Working towards the expected standard
M  Reaching the expected standard
M+  Consistently and securely meeting the expected standard
E  Working at the expected standard and exceeding in several areas
E+  Comfortably exceeding all of the expected standards

* Where a subject does not form part of the National Curriculum, subject staff have defined appropriate learning outcomes.

What information will I receive about my child’s progress in Year 7?

We issue three reports each year, one at the end of each assessment ‘block’. Reports go home towards the end of each term via email and Edulink One.

Assessment and Ongoing Grades

These are based on the grades listed above.

Key Piece Assessment

Indicates the grade achieved in a specific piece of work or test, carried out during each assessment week.

Ongoing grade

Indicates the grade that the student is working at, taking into account all work completed during the term, not just during the assessment week.

Target grade

Indicates the grade that a student should aspire to at the end of the year, based on prior attainment and a teacher’s professional judgement.

 

Attitude to Learning (ATL):

A Excellent: an exemplary attitude at all times – concentrates and participates eagerly in all activities and always willing to try their best.

B Good: a positive attitude, working hard, concentrates in lessons and participates well in a variety of tasks

C Room for improvement: does what is required but tends to lack self-motivation and concentration. Often needs encouragement to participate and work/effort is of an inconsistent standard

D Unsatisfactory: often needs significant encouragement to engage with the lesson and related tasks. Work/effort is not regularly representative of their best

E Serious cause for concern: a generally negative attitude to tasks set, often reluctant to participate willingly, regularly distracted or distracting others in lessons. Work is rarely completed to an acceptable standard

How Parents / Carers can help:
Look carefully at the grades your child has achieved in the latest progress report. Compare them with your child’s previous reports. Note any positives where your child has improved and encourage them to continue to do their very best. It is also helpful to collectively identify areas for improvement which should be revisited regularly.

Please contact us if you have any concerns or if you think your child is doing less well in a certain aspect. Your child’s form tutor, subject teachers or Head of Year can assist here and you can do this by emailing or telephoning school. Anything urgent, please call or make an appointment to come into school.

Homework Booklets in KS3
Homework booklets are an important element of assessing, recording and reporting and provide:

  • An opportunity for more detailed, in-depth work
  • A clear homework task, available on our website
  • A focus on one subject per week– along with English and maths
  • The building blocks for independent learning
  • A further opportunity for challenging able, gifted and talented students as well as providing differentiated tasks for other students
  • A common framework for assessment in each subject

How are homework booklets assessed?

  • Grades and effort levels are awarded for each piece
  • Teacher comments
  • Targets for improvement

A booklet completed at an excellent level for a particular student, showing an outstanding amount of effort, could gain 10 House Points!

Edulink One

When homework is set, your child’s teacher will record the deadline date on the Edulink One app.  All students have access to Edulink One and parents will receive an invitation to log in.

If you have any further queries about homework booklets or anything curriculum related, please do not hesitate to contact the relevant Curriculum Leader.

AR STAR Reading Age

This is your child’s reading age (in years and months) based on a reading assessment done in school.


Year 8

Our assessment system for Years 8-11 uses GCSE grades: a 9-1 scale with 9 being the highest possible award. We have added four further grades for students working below GCSE grade 1; Entry 3 (E3) to Entry 1 (E1) and Working Below 1 (WB1). These entry level grades are especially important in subjects where students may have had little experience at primary school, such as modern foreign languages and computing.

What information will I receive about my child’s progress in KS3?

We issue three reports each year, one at the end of each assessment ‘block’. Reports go home towards the end of each term via email and the SIMS Parent App.

Key Piece Assessment and Ongoing Grades

These are our new GCSE grades (9 to 1, with a +/- discriminator) and E3 to E1 & WB1.

Key Piece Assessment

Indicates the students’ current GCSE (or equivalent) grade achieved in a specific piece of work or test, carried out during each assessment week.

Ongoing grade

Indicates the current GCSE grade that the student is working at, taking into account all work completed during the term, not just during the assessment week.

Target grade

Indicates the GCSE grade that a student should aspire to at the end of the year, based on prior attainment and a teacher’s professional judgement.

 

Attitude to Learning (ATL):

A Excellent: an exemplary attitude at all times – concentrates and participates eagerly in all activities and always willing to try their best.

B Good: a positive attitude, working hard, concentrates in lessons and participates well in a variety of tasks

C Room for improvement: does what is required but tends to lack self-motivation and concentration. Often needs encouragement to participate and work/effort is of an inconsistent standard

D Unsatisfactory: often needs significant encouragement to engage with the lesson and related tasks. Work/effort is not regularly representative of their best

E Serious cause for concern: a generally negative attitude to tasks set, often reluctant to participate willingly, regularly distracted or distracting others in lessons. Work is rarely completed to an acceptable standard

How Parents / Carers can help:
Look carefully at the grades your child has achieved in the latest progress report. Compare them with your child’s previous reports. Note any positives where your child has improved and encourage them to continue to do their very best. It is also helpful to collectively identify areas for improvement which should be revisited regularly.

Please contact us if you have any concerns or if you think your child is doing less well in a certain aspect. Your child’s form tutor, subject teachers or Head of Year can assist here and you can do this by emailing or telephoning school. Anything urgent, please call or make an appointment to come into school.

Homework Booklets in Year 8
Homework booklets are an important element of assessing, recording and reporting and provide:

  • An opportunity for more detailed, in-depth work
  • A clear homework task, available on our website
  • A focus on one subject per week– along with English and maths
  • The building blocks for independent learning
  • A further opportunity for challenging able, gifted and talented students as well as providing differentiated tasks for other students
  • A common framework for assessment in each subject

How are homework booklets assessed?

  • Grades and effort levels are awarded for each piece
  • Teacher comments
  • Targets for improvement

A booklet completed at an excellent level for a particular student, showing an outstanding amount of effort, could gain 10 House Points!

Edulink One

When homework is set, your child’s teacher will record the deadline date on the Edulink One app.  All students have access to Edulink One and parents will receive an invitation to log in.

If you have any further queries about homework booklets or anything curriculum related, please do not hesitate to contact the relevant Curriculum Leader.

AR STAR Reading Age

This is your child’s reading age (in years and months) based on a reading assessment done in school.


Years 9 to 11

GCSE grades have changed in recent years; the old A-G grades have been replaced by a 9-1 scale with 9 being the highest possible award. A grade 4 is equivalent to an ‘old’ low grade C in the previous grading system and is referred to as a ‘standard pass’ by the DfE; a Grade 5 is deemed a ‘strong pass’ and a grade 7 is equivalent to a grade A.

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What is a target grade?

We use data provided by the DfE to generate a target grade for each student in each subject. The data provided uses your child’s KS2 results to indicate the expected grade for each subject at the end of KS4. We then add a small amount to ensure that all students are stretched and challenged. If a student progress more quickly or as underachieved at KS2 then we will increase the target to maintain challenge.

How can I tell if my son/daughter is on track to make the required levels of progress?

Every child will progress at a different rate and this can also differ from subject to subject. We issue predicted grades for each subject which indicate the grade we think students are most likely to achieve given their current effort in class and homework. This enables you to compare the target grades with the predicted grades.

Please remember that our targets are set to challenge students and you should not be alarmed if your child is not on or exceeding targets in all subjects. If you have any concerns about the progress of your child, please contact the relevant curriculum leader.

What information will I receive about my child’s progress in KS4?

Key Piece Assessment and Ongoing Grades

New GCSE grades (9 to 1, with a +/- discriminator).

Key Piece Assessment
Indicates the students’ current GCSE (or equivalent) grade achieved in a specific piece of work or test, carried out during our assessment weeks.  In core computing, assessments are graded as follows:

  • Developing core computing skills
  • Secure core computing skills
  • Exceeding expectations by producing computing work of an excellent standard

Ongoing grade
Indicates the current GCSE (or equivalent) grade that the student is working at, taking into account all work completed during the term, not just during the assessments.

Target grade
Indicates the GCSE (or equivalent) grade that a student should aspire to at the end of the key stage (Year 11), based on KS2 prior attainment and a teacher’s professional judgement.

Predicted grade
Predicted Grade indicates the most likely grade that the student will achieve at the end of KS4 based on all the current evidence.

AR STAR Reading Age
This is your child’s reading age (in years and months) based on a reading assessment done in school.

Attitude to learning: Homework
A Excellent: consistently completed to the best of a student’s ability and submitted on time
B Good: usually completed to the best of a student’s ability and submitted on time
C Room for Improvement: quality is variable and/or not submitted consistently on time
D Unsatisfactory: regularly completed to an unsatisfactory standard and/or regularly not submitted on time
E Serious cause for concern: persistently completed to an unsatisfactory standard and/or persistently not submitted on time

Attitude to Learning: Classwork
A Excellent: an exemplary attitude at all times – concentrates and participates eagerly in all activities and always willing to try their best
B Good: a positive attitude, working hard, concentrates in lessons and participates well in a variety of tasks
C Room for improvement: does what is required but tends to lack self-motivation and concentration
Often needs encouragement to participate and work/effort is of an inconsistent standard
D Unsatisfactory: often needs significant encouragement to engage with the lesson and related tasks. Work/effort regularly not representative of their best

How Parents / Carers can help:

Look carefully at the grades your child has achieved in the latest progress review and compare them with subsequent reviews that you will receive. Note any positives where your child has improved and encourage them to continue to do their very best.

Please contact us if you have any concerns or if you think your child is doing less well in a certain aspect. Your child’s form tutor, subject teachers or Head of Year can assist here and you can do this by emailing or telephoning school. Anything urgent, please call or make an appointment to come into school.

Homework in KS4
Homework is an important element of assessing, recording and reporting and provides:

  • An opportunity for more detailed, in-depth work
  • The building blocks for independent learning, particularly important in preparation for post 16 study
  • A variety of tasks which might include research, completing exercises, drafting essays, learning vocabulary, practising skills, preparing for assessments and so on.
  • All homework creates further opportunities to challenge students as well as provide differentiated tasks for all abilities

How is homework assessed?

  • GCSE grades and effort levels
  • Teacher comments
  • Targets for improvement
  • Peer or Self-assessment

Show My Homework

When homework is set, your child’s teacher will record the deadline date on the Show My Homework website, www.showmyhomework.co.uk. You can access this website, and learn how to view your child’s homework, by clicking this link: http://help.showmyhomework.co.uk/?b_id=10119 or by using the app on your child’s iPad.

Advice for Staff and Parents regarding assessment arrangements for GCSE exams 2021

GCSE and A level exams have been cancelled this summer and centres will be asked to award grades to students, however, there has been no indication as to what this process will look like. The consultation with schools will start in the week commencing Monday 11 January and we will then be required to wait on further information from the government. We should be careful to avoid speculation around this process and the likelihood of any student achieving any particular grade. We have informed parents that teachers have been told that they should not answer specific questions regarding the above, not because we want to be secretive, but because we do not know the answers, and that parents are welcome to email Mark if they wish to discuss this further.
In previous years, a typical conversation at parents evening would focus on GCSE grades provided on the student’s report– the mock grade, ongoing grade and predicted grade. This may have started out by discussing the mock grade, moved onto the ongoing grade and talked about the expected trajectory and whether this could be altered through increased effort and application. Parents usually understood that there were a number of unknowns in terms of the examination, effort, revision etc. and there were no guarantees about the grade students would ultimately achieve. In the current climate, some parents will believe that teachers will be awarding the grades and therefore, from their perspective, there are less unknowns. It is vital that we make it clear to parents that this is not the case!
Conversations should be about how students have worked this year, how they are coping with the move to online learning, how can we support them to make this learning as effective as possible, what they need to do between now and the end of the school year, the appropriateness of studying these or related courses in the sixth form and advise them on where to access additional support etc.

There are a number of areas that may come up during the parents evening appointments and we have written some prompts to support your responses to these potential questions.

Teacher assessed grades
Are teachers awarding students GCSE grades this summer? – Despite what has been quoted in the media, the grades awarded will NOT be ‘teacher assessed grades’. We do not yet know the specific process. However, it is likely that individual teachers will be involved in the generation of the awarded grades, but schools will apply a rigorous process to ensure that these are awarded fairly. Last year our centre assessed grades were subjected to up to four levels of moderation before these were confirmed and submitted to exam boards, and therefore the awarded grades were not the result of the any individual teacher’s decision.

Mock Exams
Will the mock result be used to indicate a teacher assessed grade? Is this the minimum grade that will be awarded? – Mock exam results will NOT be directly linked to the process for generating the centre assessed grades. The large number of students who were required to isolate at the time of the mock examinations meant it was impossible to run these in the usual manner. As such, we made the decision to send the exam papers home in many cases, and subsequently were not conducted under the strict exam conditions we would usually put in place.

Given the disruption to the students’ learning from the national lockdown in 2020-21 and the persistent impact of positive cases in this academic year, the mock exams were never planned to be used in the same way as in previous years; indeed, they could never be fair for all students. From the outset of these assessments we endeavoured to use them to identify gaps in students’ learning which we could then use to inform future lessons, which were necessary for the remainder of the year. For these reasons the school felt that it was not possible for these assessments to be directly linked to any predicted final grade and/or centre assessed grades.  In some subjects, mock exams only covered part of the course and may therefore not be a true representation of their performance in a complete examination, however they were conducted.

Ongoing grade
The definition on our website states that the ongoing grade ‘indicates the current GCSE (or equivalent) grade that the student is working at, taking into account all work completed during the term, not just during the assessments.’
If my child is already working at that grade, is this the minimum grade they can expect?

No. The process for awarding grades has not been agreed, and there will be some moderation involved in whatever process is put into place. Ongoing grades are indicative of the work being completed at that time, and do not necessarily factor in other elements of the course which may, or may not, be the strengths of that student.

Predicted final grade
What grade do you think my child would have got this summer?  These have not been included on reports as parents may well have then expected these to be the grades students would be awarded in summer. Parents may request an indication of the grade their child may have achieved if exams had been sat in the summer, but please offer a grade range of what they may have achieved rather than a grade you think they would have achieved. It is understandable that parents and students will want an idea of the grades they will achieve, but please stress that we do not know what the process will be for awarding grades, and whatever the process is, teachers will have an input but will not be simply allowed to award any unmoderated grades.

Parents may enquire as to how we can give predicted final grades in a ‘normal’ year but will not commit to a grade now. In recent years, over 90% of our predicted final grades have been within one grade of the final achieved outcome. These predictions cannot account for the unpredictable factors, e.g. how a student responds to the pressures of the final exams, effectiveness of revision, illness on the day etc. Whatever process is presented for generating the centre assessed grades we know that this will be a rigorous one which undergoes several layers of moderation before being submitted to the exam board. In 2020, this moderation process resulted in grades being submitted to the exam board which were in line with the high standards achieved year on year by Haslingden High students.

Target grade

The definition on our website states that the target grade indicates ‘the GCSE (or equivalent) grade that a student should aspire to at the end of the key stage (Year 11), based on KS2 prior attainment and a teacher’s professional judgement.’

Should I expect my child to achieve their target grades?
Not necessarily. It is hard to generalise, but these grades are meant to be aspirational and not the grades we ‘expect’ students to achieve. That said target grades are set based on a student’s prior attainment and are designed to be challenging but achievable. Subsequently these may be suitable for use on a sixth form or college application as they are good indication of grades which a student could potentially aspire to.

Extra work
What can my child do to prove that they are capable of achieving a particular grade?
Given all the uncertainties ‘proving’ anything is particularly difficult. The advice to students is that they should continue to work hard and try their best to do everything they can to enhance their own learning. Hopefully they will be able to return to school after half term and there will be opportunities for students to demonstrate what they have learnt. Indeed, there may still be formal assessments that contribute to the students’ grade that is awarded in the summer. They should be encouraged to learn independently and students’ attitude to learning may well be taken into account as part of a teacher’s professional judgement, which may well be a contributory factor to the final GCSE grade awarded.

As you can see from the advice above that there are very few definitive statements and lots of ‘may’, ‘could’ etc. Hopefully parents evening will reinforce the message that teachers will not simply be able to award whatever grades they like for students, and given the uncertainty, we are unable to give many definite statements or provide concrete answers to parents’ questions.

College Applications
How should my child complete sixth form/college application forms which ask for predicted final grades?
Predicted grades are not a significant element in the application process to sixth forms or colleges, but simply allow them to gain an idea as to the appropriateness of the courses students are applying for. The actual grades students achieve will be the main factor in determining whether they are accepted onto a particular course, though we expect that sixth forms and colleges will be mindful of the experiences students have had since March 2020; certainly all students will be considered on an individual basis in our sixth form, if entry requirements are not met this summer. In post-16 applications, students can use predicted final grades from their block B report in Year 10 or use the target grades where these are appropriate; there is usually no checks on the ‘accuracy’ of these by sixth forms/colleges. If any student has any difficulty regarding this they can contact Mrs Finney, sfinney@haslingdenhigh.com.


Year 12 and 13

Block A progress reports are issued to all students towards the end of each term.

In a KS5 Progress Report, the following information is provided:

Attitude to Learning: Classwork
A Excellent: an exemplary attitude at all times – concentrates and participates eagerly in all activities and always willing to try their best
B Good: a positive attitude, working hard, concentrates in lessons and participates well in a variety of tasks
C Room for improvement: does what is required but tends to lack self-motivation and concentration
Often needs encouragement to participate and work/effort is of an inconsistent standard
D Unsatisfactory: often needs significant encouragement to engage with the lesson and related tasks. Work/effort regularly not representative of their best

Homework and Independent Study (IS)

Homework and Independent Study are an important part of learning in the sixth form.  Independent Study is not simply completing homework, but reflects the time each learner spends reflecting on their work, reading around a subject, or engaging in wider learning via the internet, television and social media, for example by subscribing to TED Talks or the Khan Academy.

Independent study is fundamental to success in KS5 and at university. We timetable all students for three periods of independent study in a room staffed with a teacher, but this should be seen as just the beginning. A regular and genuine commitment to independent study will pay huge dividends in final grades.

A Excellent: always completed to the best of a student’s ability
B Very good: usually completed to the best of a student’s ability
C Room for Improvement: quality is variable
D Unsatisfactory: regularly completed to an unsatisfactory standard
E Serious cause for concern: persistently completed to an unsatisfactory standard

Key Piece Assessment, Ongoing, Predicted Final Grade and Target Grade
For A level courses grades A*- E or U (no pass) and for vocational courses grades Di* (Distinction*), Di (Distinction), M (Merit), P (Pass) or U (no pass).

Key Piece Assessment
Indicates the students’ current A Level (or equivalent) grade achieved in a specific piece of work or test, carried out during the Block Assessment week.

Ongoing grade
Indicates the current grade that the student is working at, taking into account all work completed during the term, not just during the assessment week.

Predicted Final Grade
Indicates the grade that your child’s teacher believes that they are most likely to achieve at the end of the course. This is based upon a teacher’s professional judgement of the ability and performance demonstrated to date.

Target grade
Shows the grade that a student should aspire to and could, at best, achieve at the end of the course. This is based upon a teacher’s professional judgement of the ability and performance demonstrated to date.

How Parents / Carers can help:
Look carefully at the grades your child has achieved in the latest progress review and com-pare them with subsequent reviews that you will receive. Note any positives where your child has improved and encourage them to continue to do their very best.Please contact us if you have any concerns or if you think your child is doing less well in a certain aspect. Your child’s Head of Year is the first point of contact for this and you can contact them by emailing or telephoning school. Anything urgent, please call or make an appointment to come into school.

If you have any further queries about anything curriculum related, please do not hesitate to contact the relevant Curriculum Leader.